5 A Day Books: Week 10: Eric Carle

Read all about the benefits and ideas behind the 5-a-day book challenge here and please consider joining in! 
I’m very excited to be participating in a tribute to the wonderful Eric Carle this week in honour of his birthday on 25th June, in an event designed by the lovely Kate at An Amazing Child.

Throughout the week there will be a whole group of bloggers writing about his work, choosing favourite books and producing art and play ideas based on his stories! On Saturday there will be a link up to showcase all of the wonderful ideas and I can’t wait to see them all! If you have anything to contribute, pop back on Saturday to link your idea to the list.

So, it flows naturally that our 5 choices for this week’s 5-a-Day Books are all Eric Carle stories! This is the first week that I don’t own all of the titles already, so we are off to the library today to get the ones we are missing.

This book is beautifully presented with clear plastic pages that overlay the printed ones, giving a lovely effect of layering and consequently hiding some elements of the pictures, to be discovered as a surprise. This is a more recent book by Carle and is a story about all the male animals that look after their babies!

This book was the VERY first ever book I bought when I started to train to be a teacher (well actually my Dad bought it for me as I set about in a last-minute blind panic trying to plan my first lesson….for 5 children, ha!) It is the perfect book for young children. It is written in a very steady beat, rhymes throughout, and contains animals and simple descriptions. This was also the first book my colleague and I learnt in Makaton and our 5 year olds could recite it off by heart, using all the signs flawlessly!

 This story is very sweet and funny about a chameleon who wants to try out being a range of different animals that he encounters at the zoo. He learns, of course, that he needs to be happy in his own skin to be truly happy at all! Lovely bright images and plenty of potential for great conversations around wings/ claws/ paws/ tails/ beaks etc.

 This book tells a beautifully simple account of the life cycle of a seed with gorgeous illustrations and lovely descriptive language. It is perfect for trying to introduce the basics of how plants grow and what happens to the seeds after the flower dies.

 Ah, last but surely, not possible to ever be least, this wonderful, iconic book. This was my very first picture book as a child and I still have vivid memories of sitting on my Mum’s lap, poking my fingers through the holes and exclaiming with delight at that amazing array of food that the caterpillar devours on Saturday! It makes me smile that this is now Cakie’s favourite page too and I love to see Pop babbling her way through it independently.

Mr Carle, your books have already worked their magic on two generations in this home, and here’s to more to come!
Do you have a recent post about picture books or reading with your little ones? Are you participating in the 5-a-Day scheme? Please add your link below and take some time to visit the others listed to see who else is in our group and say hello! 
Thank You

5 comments to 5 A Day Books: Week 10: Eric Carle

  • Mr Seahorse…hmm I like the sounds of that one. We didn’t have that one in our library.

  • We dont have Mr. Seahorse in our library either. I bet the pictures are wonderful fun. I can’t wait to try and find it.

  • Love your books this week. I especially loved using The Tiny Seed when I taught my 2nd graders. The illustrations are great!

    We just linked an activity we did with a book-Octopus Opposites… and I’ll link up our 5-books-a-day post later tonight.

  • We love Eric Carle books. I grew up reading them and now I am reading them to my sons. Have a fun week reading them.

  • Hadn’t heard of Mister Seahorse. Had fun looking at Eric Carle’s website this evening.

    Hoping to post about our books for this week soon but was thinking whilst reading a rather tedious Postman Pat book, not for the first time, this week, about some of the books beloved of little ones but hated by parents, well at least by me. All of our children have loved Fireman Sam, Bob the builder and Postman Pat yet they have no repetition, rhyme or interesting vocabulary. Any thoughts about why they are so loved? I’m sure that if I gave the children a free hand in choosing they would often feature in our 5-a-Day choices!